10bpm dance party


#1

Stumbled across this browsing the World Wide Web. Seems like fun to me, I might send a track. Anybody want to collaborate?


#2

Came here to post this after I read it on The Wire. Thought you might be interested.
I think I’ll come up with something :slight_smile:


#3

Cool. May have to give it a go.


#4

haha this is brilliant thanks a lot for sharing! Not sure if I can squeeze in another project, but I’ll sure try to!


#5

Yes…sounds good - i like the idea that they dont mind being sent something unfinished. More to the point- has anyone worked out any dance moves for 10bpm? without looking like you are doing a bad impression of a ghost.


#6

Slightly off-topic but I’ve seen DJ sets before where the DJ only played records meant to be played at 45, at 33rpm. Interesting, and of course you get MORE BASS. Always a good thing :slight_smile:


#7

yes! do we need a 73% thread? here’s one of my favorites:


#8

I think “the ghost” is definitely the go-to dance move here. The trick is to do it well. ;^)


#9

I dont understand 10 bpm? Is this meant only for 4/4 music? I could just zoom in and add beats at the some insane resolution. Only Accents at 10 bpm? Bpm as a concept and construct is meaningless. I came from the psytrance music scene and the first think anyone would ask you when you said you were a producer was “oh what bpm is your stuff?”

I hope this is not offending to those whom may find such an exercise intriguing and if you manage to bend the rules in such an excercise in a way that exposes the fallacy of the BPM status quo then power to you. But the way bpm is such a key jumping off point to much music creation is something that really irks me! Personally I could dance to any tempo.


#10

Sure you can make the concept meaningless with 32nd notes. Or you can try to understand what slow dance music feels like and use mostly whole, half, quarter, and eighth notes. Most dance music is 4/4 but it doesn’t have to be. All musical constructs are ultimately arbitrary.


#11

Yeah I get that…maybe it just sounds annoying as it would be hard for me to work in this manner…Considering that most of the hardware and software I use would not even go to 10 bpm :frowning:

I would have to scale it on the grid or other means which I have long abandoned. I guess I still cant comprehend BPM on this fundamental level.

But id be interested in hearing peoples attempt at dynamism on this level no doubt.


#12

Tempo expressed as BPM significantly predates electronic music.

Maybe a simpler way to say it is “a beat every 6 seconds.” You can count that out if you want or use an old school metronome. Or use 20bpm in your daw and slow it down to 50% afterwards. Or use 20bpm and avoid using too many eighth notes. You get the idea.


#13

I’m trying to remember the name of a Japanese modern dancer who dances very very slowly, perhaps based on some kabuki traditions? Anybody help me out here?


#14

I still dont get it…the beat is just one part…and is usually subdivided…so which is the part of the beat that is meant to be at 10bpm…then there are the other elements…what if there are polyrhythms


#15

I think there may be less to “get” here than you are hoping for. You need tempo and meter together to make any sense, and you’re correct to point out that specifying tempo without meter makes it a bit meaningless, but I infer from “dance music” that we’re talking about 4/4. That being said, it’s not at all unusual to use polymeter and polyrhythm in dance music, so you could certainly stretch the meaning of things however you wish. They just might not play your track if it feels “wrong” somehow.

I suppose they could have said “larghissimo” but that might have been even more confusing.


#16

Larghissimo…nice! Thanks for that!


#17

I’m doing the former. Using paulstretch after the dizzying speeds of 20bpm.


#18

If you use a metronome BPM means the beat is every time the metronome makes “click”, so 10bpm would be 10 clicks a minute. In most DAWs BPM refers to how many quarter notes happen a minute. This is not linked to 4/4 in any way. You can have a 7/8 tempo and still measure how many 1/4 notes would fit in that (it’s just more complicated math). So if you have a 4/4 measure and 10BPM you get 2 and a half bars per minute, if you have 7/8 something like 2,8… but of course the bars won’t fit neatly into a minute like with quarter notes. So yeah, if you take BPMs the DAW way it does not mean all that much, since you could do a piece with just semibreves and one with just 32th notes and it would still be 10BPM. I think it’s more about the concept than the math though. It’s about making dance music that is really slooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooow.
And that’s amazing imho. :smiley:


#19

My OP-1 only goes down to 40. sigh


#20

Takehisa Kosugi’s Anima? I’m not sure if it is supposed to be a dance piece though.