"boku" by matt lowery

Wow! Thanks! I used this code!

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Thank you! Looking forward to checking it out for my Friday morning $DayJob soundtrack!

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Man this whole project turned out great! I’m stoked to have contributed some sounds and I’m definitely going to revisit Hard Boiled Wonderland very soon.

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Yes indeed! On the track “cashion”, a field recording plays on the left channel, and on the right channel is a copy of that field recording processes through the lyra’s delay and distortion. It’s such an incredible tool for processing external sounds.

There’s also a fair bit of pulsar 23 delay noodling on “watashi”. One of my favorite pulsar techniques is to patch up feedback networks through the attenuators and play those off of each other.

Good ear!

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I used this code. Many thanks, the music is gorgeous

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Thank you again for sharing this! Had an initial listen on Friday while driving around town doing some errands, then had a more focused listen today on my walk and bus ride in to work this morning (looking forward to the late night listen tonight on my ride and walk home at 1a.) Love the atmosphere of the whole album and especially the sequence of cashion + boku, with the latter probably being my favorite track at the moment, though it’s hard to separate the two of them due how lovely cashion is on its own and the transition/setup that it gives to boku and how they complement each other.

I love how fluid and familiar your process for this album sounds, and I’m curious how the tracks developed and your process of completing them in relation to one another within the time frame you gave yourself. Did you work through one track at a time, kind of linearly following the “invisible path” of the eventual album as each track grew into the next, or did your process kind of jump around working on bits here and there and growing the whole field at once? I’m sure much more likely is an inbetween/other/more nuanced process than those, but I’d love to hear about that organizational side of your focused creative process and how you feel about it after everything’s done!

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After several listens, the title track is far and away my favorite, though the whole EP is great. Killer stuff, dude.

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yay this came out! can’t wait to give it a good listen. love your work @mattlowery

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Thank you so much for listening. It really means the world to me. Sharing music with friends remains one of life’s greatest joys.

I suppose the production of this EP was the combination of a couple of things:

  1. It served as a kind of capstone project for many of the techniques, processes, and vibes that I had been working on every day for many months. Something about the Murakami text took me to a very deep and familiar place, and served as a kind of guide rail for the decisions made about the EP. Though “decisions” is the wrong word, because I tried not to think about anything too much. This is one of the benefits of a daily practice: muscle memory. It’s nice to have that with modular, finally, after 18 months of stumbling around in the dark, constantly feeling like I’m trying to perform open heart surgery while wearing mittens.

But, as much as I could, I tried to just sit down for a couple hours and play, freeing myself of all expectation, and committing to use of the material whether I liked it or not. I think that set of restrictions freed my unconscious mind to have fun and say something. I set a firm end date, and held myself to it (I think I told @taylor12k that if he didn’t have mixes from me in five days to ping me and tell me to stop taking things so seriously).

  1. Perhaps the more important item: these days I try to be aware of (and take advantage of) the little manic/depressive cycles that are par for the course for any creative person (or at least the ones I’m friends with). I call them “peaks and valleys”. I have learned that they are part of who I am, and that understanding them/accepting them is a better path to health than trying to correct for them.

So, there are going to be some days every month where I’m in a valley, where I feel like nothing is worth doing, believing, feeling, etc. If I’m not careful, I’ll pick fights with people I love, challenge systems that don’t need challenging, believe that my artistic output is and always has been worthless. Etc etc etc. And there are also going to be some days where I ideate almost constantly and manically, where creativity feels like a fire hydrant that I cannot shut off, and every idea I have is THE BEST IDEA EVERRRRRRRR.

And everything in between. I’m about to turn 36, and by no means dwell in The Castle of Perfect Mental Health, but I have begun to recognize what my chemical cycles feel like, how long they last, and that they are indeed cycles, like the tide coming in and receding. So, part of the deal with that is, when I feel a peak coming on, instead of trying to calm the wave, I endeavor to ride it.

That is a very longwinded way to say that I saw a peak on the horizon, and was also simultaneously very inspired by the art I had recently consumed, and it kind of made for a very brief perfect storm.

  1. Ok, a bonus thought: I have always been so precious about my music–and have these grand illusions in my mind of composers who sit in rooms alone and eventually emerge with their magnum opus-- but every time I collaborate with friends, the music gets immeasurably better. The best decision I made on this EP was to reach out to friends and ask if they wanted to play along. It would not exist without the life that they breathed into it. Music is a conversation; adding more unique voices almost always enhances the end product.

@hankyates thank you Hank! I hope you enjoy.

@Zeke_B thanks Zeke! You brought Murakami into my life, and this thing wouldn’t exist without that material. I am very grateful!

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Regarding the insights on cycles, it’s interesting that this experience seems to feel unusual for many of us who are male bodied, as if our “natural” state is somehow supposed to be more or less static…. In my experience nothing could be further from the truth…

Thanks for sharing your thoughts, I’m really enjoying this beautiful recording!

Edit: changed “be something” to “feel”…

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Will give a listen shortly @mattlowery !

p.s. Kafka on the Shore and Wind-Up bird Chronicle

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Had time to listen to it several time and I love this album. I like when ambient music is not too smooth. I also like the narrative aspect and the sound spatialization play a big role I think in this felling of visiting places. That and also Boku sounds like “nice ass” in french :wink:

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L.H.O.O.Q.

L.H.O.O.Q. - Wikipedia.

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@mattlowery I’m listening to it non stop in the car, I am truly enjoying it, even if I haven’t read the book. Congratulations!

Btw that sound on Boku is really powerful and interesting, would you mind explaining how you made it?

Thanks!

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Definitely!

The synth part is an MS-20. I’ve got a sample & hold modulating the LPF cutoff, and I’m playing the HPF cutoff knob, the mod shape, and depth. When the cutoff of the HPF approaches the LPF cutoff value, the MS-20 becomes really unstable in a beautiful way. Also, playing the modulation shape knob is really strange; it doesn’t always do what you’d expect.

The field recording is being processed through my modular: if I remember correctly it’s playing from Morphagene, and then through a coterie of FX that are being switched between with Synapse. I’ll see if so labeled the chain when I’m back at my computer!

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Loving this album thanks for sharing!

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Thank you (and everyone else) for listening. I deeply appreciate it!

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just finished listening and appreciated many moments plus the overall approach to this album

the last two tracks were my favorites

especially pleasant to hear the way kekulé ended…it felt like finishing a great meal and left me w/ a delightful aural “aftertaste”

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Ahh, this makes me so happy to hear! It was done unconsciously at the time, but I think my hope on that track was to communicate a sense of giving oneself over to…well, I suppose to whatever. That’s up to the listener. Letting a space (a reverb in this instance) slowly creep up and then ultimately take over felt right. An acceptance of one’s surroundings.

Anyway I’m rambling, but thank you for listening.

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really beautiful intent behind your choice
thanks for sharing!

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