Controlling (lowering) grid brightness

Looking through the archives, I can’t seem to find a way to universally lower the grid’s LED brightness level. I’m having difficulty working with it for any extended period at the default level, and am hoping there is a method via norns, or other?

Thanks!

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In the grid-howto patcher I have in Max, my Grayscale 64 (not varibright) responds to the osc message “/monome/grid/led/intensity $1” where $1 is a value between 0 and 15. My grid doesn’t remember the value so I have to send it every time I plug it in. I’d be happy to PM you a patch where you can set it in Max if you’re working on a laptop. Not too fluent with Norns so I’m not sure how you do it there.

for no particular reason, we have not exposed the intensity setting on norns.

it is very simple to add; opened GH issue.

with that, if you wanted to universally lower the intensity of all grids, the simplest way would be to hack the system-wide grid connection callback, e.g. here.

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Sorry for the slightly off track question, but could controlling the overall brightness also work for arc with norns?

i have never really used an arc but my understanding is: no.

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Thanks @wheelersounds and @zebra. Having control within norns of the grid brightness (I’m using grid exclusively connected to norns) would be amazing.

I might be alone on the desire to lower the grid’s brightness…I’m sure its handy when working outdoors or in bright rooms, but here in the studio it is like staring at the surface of the sun!

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Oh I totally agree, during daylight hours it’s fine but when I’m on stage and/or the lights are low it can be pretty blinding!

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I was thinking it may be useful if the grid’s brightness level could be adjusted per-script, maybe in settings. It would be helpful if this could be globally reset too. Another useful aspect I imagined was the ability to switch between two modes: control grid brightness “globally” or “individually”.

Necro, and almot-off-topic, but 20 characters of “rotation” as well…

EDIT: To clarify, I mean specifically that it would be great if more scripts would expose it…

It would be great if we could control the Grid brightness in Norns. Will it be posible in a future upgrade?

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Presuming you can send raw serialosc from norns (i don’t know how) you should just be able to send the intensity osc message, ya?

well no, norns doesn’t use OSC to talk to grid, it opens the serial port directly.

but we have exposed intensity as a method on grid devices, you can set it from a script or the REPL
https://monome.org/docs/norns/api/modules/grid.html#Grid:intensity
(ha, nice docs on that one)

but we do not have anything like a system-wide grid intensity preference that will be applied to all connected grids. i would consider a mod for that?

the mod i made as an example does grid rotation and intensity: GitHub - monome/grid-settings: norns mod for setting grid intensity and rotation

(unfortunately the newest grid doesn’t have intensity implemented but there’s a firmware fix coming)

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hmm… so there is no way for me to have a global control for brightness yet? Like an abstraction layer …as a global setting inside Norn’s settings?

As far as I understand that intensity setting (i:) that got exposed is more for my own script to control it?

Problem: My mancave is quite dark at night …the Grid’s brightness is hurting my eyes.

see the post above. if you have a newest grid and it isn’t working we can send you firmware update instructions

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I have a brand new grid, yes! Sorry … I just learned about mods 10 minutes ago! Damn newbs! :disguised_face:

I’d love to update my cold-white grid to allow intensity as well. Is the firmware widely available yet? :slight_smile:

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cold-white to yellow-white would be great as well :upside_down_face: (has anybody ever modded his Grid to change the LED colour?)

You’d have to replace all the LEDs - I’m pretty sure the ones used in official Grids are single-colour LEDs, so there’s no possibility of shifting their hue/colour.

I was thinking more like something what the light technicians call “gel” – it’s what they put in front of their light cans to make white any colour they want.