Disquiet Junto Project 0377: Algorithms Assemble

#1

Each Thursday in the Disquiet Junto group, a new compositional challenge is set before the group’s members, who then have just over four days to upload a track in response to the assignment. Membership in the Junto is open: just join and participate. (A SoundCloud account is helpful but not required.) There’s no pressure to do every project. It’s weekly so that you know it’s there, every Thursday through Monday, when you have the time.

Deadline: This project’s deadline is Monday, March 25, 2019, at 11:59pm (that is, just before midnight) wherever you are. It was posted in the early evening, California time, on Thursday, March 21, 2019.

These are the instructions that went out to the group’s email list (at tinyletter.com/disquiet-junto):

Disquiet Junto Project 0377: Algorithms Assemble
The Assignment: Have fun with rules applied to scales, in coordination with the Algorithmic Art Assembly.

This week’s project is being done with the Algorithmic Art Assembly, “a brand new two day conference and music festival, showcasing a diverse range of artists who are using algorithmic tools and processes in their works.” It’s being held in San Francisco on March 22 and 23, 2019. More information at aaassembly.org. The project is lightly adapted from one proposed by Junto member Charlie Kramer (aka NorthWoods).

Step 1: Define a scale of 8 notes (or sounds).

Step 2: Create a melody with 4 notes from the scale resulting from Step 1.

Step 3: Replace note 2 in the melodic sequence from Step 2 with an unused note (selected deterministically or randomly). Then do this for note 4, then for note 3, and then for note 1.

Step 4: Reintroduce the first melody as counterpoint to the result of Step 3. This establishes a pair of notes at each point in time.

Step 5: Repeat the algorithm on these pairs. Repeat to create triplets.

Step 6: Sequence variations to create a piece of music.

Extra credit: Do the same with note durations and velocities (e.g., 8 possibilities, 4 choices).

Seven More Important Steps When Your Track Is Done:

Step 1: Include “disquiet0377” (no spaces or quotation marks) in the name of your track.

Step 2: If your audio-hosting platform allows for tags, be sure to also include the project tag “disquiet0377” (no spaces or quotation marks). If you’re posting on SoundCloud in particular, this is essential to subsequent location of tracks for the creation a project playlist.

Step 3: Upload your track. It is helpful but not essential that you use SoundCloud to host your track.

Step 4: Post your track in the following discussion thread at llllllll.co:

https://llllllll.co/t/disquiet-junto-project-0377-algorithms-assemble/

Step 5: Annotate your track with a brief explanation of your approach and process.

Step 6: If posting on social media, please consider using the hashtag #disquietjunto so fellow participants are more likely to locate your communication.

Step 7: Then listen to and comment on tracks uploaded by your fellow Disquiet Junto participants.

Additional Details:

Deadline: This project’s deadline is Monday, March 25, 2019, at 11:59pm (that is, just before midnight) wherever you are on. It was posted in the early evening, California time, on Thursday, March 21, 2019.

Length: The length is up to you.

Title/Tag: When posting your track, please include “disquiet0377” in the title of the track, and where applicable (on SoundCloud, for example) as a tag.

Upload: When participating in this project, post one finished track with the project tag, and be sure to include a description of your process in planning, composing, and recording it. This description is an essential element of the communicative process inherent in the Disquiet Junto. Photos, video, and lists of equipment are always appreciated.

Download: Consider setting your track as downloadable and allowing for attributed remixing (i.e., a Creative Commons license permitting non-commercial sharing with attribution, allowing for derivatives).

For context, when posting the track online, please be sure to include this following information:

More on this 377th weekly Disquiet Junto project — Algorithms Assemble / The Assignment: Have fun with rules applied to scales, in coordination with the Algorithmic Art Assembly — at:

https://disquiet.com/0377/

The project is lightly adapted from one proposed by Junto member Charlie Kramer (aka NorthWoods).

More on the Disquiet Junto at:

https://disquiet.com/junto/

Subscribe to project announcements here:

http://tinyletter.com/disquiet-junto/

Project discussion takes place on llllllll.co:

https://llllllll.co/t/disquiet-junto-project-0377-algorithms-assemble/

There’s also on a Junto Slack. Send your email address to twitter.com/disquiet for Slack inclusion.

Image associated with this project is from the graphics for the Algorithmic Art Assembly, “a brand new two day conference and music festival, showcasing a diverse range of artists who are using algorithmic tools and processes in their works.” It’s being held in San Francisco on March 22 and 23, 2019. More information at aaassembly.org.

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#2

The project is now live.

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#3

Tough one! Will be fun to see what happens with these instructions, but I’m into it. Thanks again for a cool prompt. Regards to @NorthWoods for the recipe, too.

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#4

Hey All, I went with a simple melody and just moved the midi notes around on my scale. I used the CS-80 softsynth for 3 different sounds. I then copied those 3 2 times and put a different midi scale for each section. One of the sounds repeats forever the notes played and those continue to build up so at the end it is just those sounds going. This is my favorite part and it is a sound I probably never would have gotten on my own without using this algorithm so cool assignment Marc. Also Cheers to Marc for keeping this thing going and keeping us from entropy.

Peace, Hugh

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#5

Oh, yes, Charlie is here, as @NorthWoods. Thanks for that.

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#6

Not quite sure I understand Steps 4 and 5. How can the algorithm be repeated when the sounds to be switched out are already playing? Do we randomise it at this point (so instead of 2, 4, 3, 1 it might be 4, 1, 3, 2)?

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#7

Here’s my submission for this week’s challenge - appolgies about the terrible pun in the title, but Riley’s work came to mind listening back to the finished track:

Made with two instances of Roland’s System 100 plugout. Of course being me, I had to embelish the instructions a little: the first sequence is playing 16th notes, whilst the second plays 8th notes an octave lower than the orginal. The sequences reverse (curve ha-ha) after each time through so play through first forwards then backwards - and of course they mirror each other so when one is going forwards, the other is going backwards… I also kept increasing the dry wet of the tape delay, so more and more echoes are added.
Hope you enjoy it and have a great weekend
Rupert

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#8

Hi. As I’ve interpreted it — and these are often interpreted differently — in Step 4 you’re playing the original melody against (in counterpoint to) the altered melody (that is simultaneously, or off a bit). In Step 5, you alter both the original melody and the altered one.

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#9

Ah ! I thought you were applying the algorithm to each of the two-notes chords. It makes more sense now. BTW, Marc, the Bay Area is a bit from Paris, do you know if the conferences at AAAssembly will be video taped and broadcast on Youtube later on ? Best

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#10

Step 1: Define a scale of 8 notes (or sounds).
Step 2: Create a melody with 4 notes from the scale resulting from Step 1.
Step 3: Replace note 2 in the melodic sequence from Step 2 with an unused note (selected deterministically or randomly). Then do this for note 4, then for note 3, and then for note 1.

Step 4: Reintroduce the first melody as counterpoint to the result of Step 3. This establishes a pair of notes at each point in time.

My scale is a 8 note diatonic that goes:

C-D-E-F#-G#-A#-B-Ch8

My 4 note melody is C-E-C8-G#

I did the permutations suggested on step 3, I just added some high notes to give it some spark, then I went on with step 4 and then started to develop freely.

3 different pianos (one muted and played with mallets)

Orchestral samples and treatments.

Paris, Friday 22nd March 2019

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#11


I missed ya all! good luck Marc tell M hello for me if you see her machine walking around. I used the Roland 808 drum machine to create the patterns. I then tooks sounds DX Bell, Nightmare, Treble Kalimba,plastic bubble drumkit to loop into the pattern while, playing the Korg SV1 with a vocal Nana clip from splice I used to map to the Korg. I also added a pad to the instrument that would be triggered by some of the keys. I hope you have a great day!

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#12

This was a fun challenge, trying to follow the rules laid out with a simple kalimba sound. I added a little beat-repeat fx for variation and other pieces got mingled in and effects applied to create an alien and, I think, slightly curious atmosphere.

Also… I found a little funk in the auditory corners of today’s challenge :slight_smile:

All produced in Ableton, with U-he compressors, Soundtoys effects and a little isotope-based quick limiting.

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#13

Hi. They did appear to be filming it. If it goes online (and I don’t appear to be drooling or utterly confused) I’ll share the link for sure.

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#14

The music does follow an algorithm, though slightly different than the prompt: A line of four notes is mutated, note at a time into a different line with different notes from the scale. This is then repeated two more times. Each mutation is played slightly skewed in time from each other.

As played on the marimbas it makes a complex cascading line. As played on the organ it reveals a four chord sequence that the piece ultimately ends with.

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#15

Hi all! Thanks Marc for picking up my idea. The general idea came to me when I was trying to build a program that would take a phrase that I played into it and play it back at me slightly differently. I eventually created a thing in which two robot musicians would trade phrases and I repurposed some of the code for this.

following the prompt more or less, I set up a sequence like this:

set up 8 notes and 8 note durations in two separate vectors
sample without replacement four notes and durations
play those notes / durations using a Rhodes sound, then joined by an organ sound
replace the second note, play altered notes on Rhodes and original on organ
replace the fourth note, play altered notes on Rhodes and original on organ
replace the first note, play altered notes on Rhodes and original on organ

bring back the original melody; Rhodes and organ are joined by vibraphone

repeat the whole sequence (I have it set up to repeat four times–feel free to download it
and change it to repeat 50,000 times, or maybe zero times)

code is available here: github.com/charliekramer/ChucK…ter/disquiet0377.ck

Cheers,

Charlie

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#16

This one was interesting… I happened to be in the same house with my old Moog Sonic VI, so I made a 24 tone scale (you can set the keyboard scaling… see images) and used bits from the first half of the scale to produce the 8 notes, then arranged according to the instructions (I’m not sure that I completely understood what I was doing). I fiddled the rhythm at the end and added a bit of a drum loop. The old Moog needs a servicing, so there was some line noise in the recording. I just recorded a track of the line noise by itself, and amplified it, then treated that with a heavily modulated delay.

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#17

Eight samples were taken, one from each of the previous eight tracks on the BSOD album. These were then arranged as per the project brief. No additional sounds were used.

Vocals: Zero Meaning

it’s beautiful
the way you act in company
infectious
the way you smile and glow
so giving
but only when it’s convenient to you
do you remember
in the past, when we were friends?
underneath, the heart has stopped
mould and flies and decay
always cold in here, always
tongue in a jar
underneath, it’s horror
death and rot and ruin
if only i could love you
if only i could

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#18

that’s an amazing piece and also an amazing piece of gear! I love that in the second picture it’s cut off at the right so it looks like it reads “Noise Soup.” I wish I had a synth with a Noise Soup button! :slight_smile:

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#19

Noise Soup must be a type of chowder. You’re asked to choose between the white (Boston) and pink (Manhattan) varieties.

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#20

C Phrygian scale. Used iOS Fugue Machine driving Korg Module and Cyclops. I wanted to use Fugue Machine to introduce more movement and variety without straying too far from the guidelines. All of the play heads are playing different octaves at different speeds and directions and are introduced gradually throughout the piece. I introduced Cyclops towards the end to add another voice. Not super happy with it, but it was the best out of my experiments. Good brain exercise nonetheless.

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