Experimental music notation resources

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#75

@laborcamp: just wanted to thank you for posting all these beautiful scores! would love to learn where you find these.


#76

@myecholalia all of these have been found somewhere out on the internet. I have collected these over the years, as I like to use them in classes.
(Even though I teach in a predominantly visual art school, my own interests lie in hybrid and mixed media areas. So I emphasize structure, systems and organizational thinking, where these scores come handy as examples of unorthodox approaches to these ideas.)


#77

+1

I had the pleasure of being completely surprised by her work at the Made in LA exhibit in 2012. I had never heard of her before that, and her works easily became my favorites of the exhibition.

This one is mind-bogglingly amazing:


#78

Alfred Schnittke:


#79

Another John Cage score:


#80

How about these beautiful scores by a Fluxus composer Toshi Ichiyanagi:












#81

that might be my fav post in this thread

such style!


#82

I agree! :smile:
To me these (especially all the vertical ones) seem to convey a very distinct sense of language. I love how the precise graphic expression is balanced with a kind of poetic openness of interpretation.


#83

I think @laborcamp has won this thread. Keeps getting better!


#84

Don’t think these have been posted yet…

Mads Emil Nielsen - FRAMEWORK




#85

Lovely! Never seen those. Thank you for sharing @analogue01 !


#86

I don’t think anyone’s posted any Christian Wolff yet – here’s a page from Music for 1, 2 or 3 People:


#87

Wow! Amazing! Thank you for sharing!
Did you take this picture?


#88

You’re welcome! Glad you like it. And yes, I took that picture a little earlier that evening – it showed up in the mail today.


#89

Could you post more then?
I would love to see more… if possible.


#90

Sure, will post some more when the light is good again…


#91

Amazing thread! Thanks laborcamp for sharing all this, so much awesome stuff here.

I’m a designer/architect and I sometimes struggle with the imbalance between the relative ease of creating finished 2D/3D work compared to the more nebulous and amorphous world of sound. Visual ideas are much easier for me to generate and resolve, whereas musical ideas can be much more challenging to structure and organize.

Just a few days ago I was sketching out the “story arc” of an upcoming live set as an exercise to try and address this gap. It’s not really a compositional notation so much as a line graph showing the relative energy of each track in the set. Thought it was worth sharing:


#92

Roland Kayn:


#93

Dick Higgins:






#94

Anestis Logothetis: