Filtering: Acoustic Signals

Dear llllllll’s,

I’m realizing more and more that I desire to apply subtractive synthesis methods to acoustic signals. “Filtering” is what I’ve been thinking about a lot.

Does anybody else feel this way? Does anybody else do this?

If so, what blows your mind? What changes your perspective on listening and sound? And specifically, what do you do and how do you do it?

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I process my field recordings often via the filters of my plumbutter and love it being lofi. I’d rather pick a dirty/high res filter than a clean one. In euro I would go for a plague bearer, r*s reseq or ifm sprott for example. Also bitcrushing/s&h and wavefolding is fun for acoustic signals.

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monolase
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Yea, this is a primary sound design technique for me. I find that by starting with a sound that’s not only complex in terms of harmonics, but also in in dynamics, I can create far more interesting textures. I’ve always had the opinion that an acoustic instrument can create a far more interesting array of sounds than an synthesizer, so by basically combining the two using electronics the possibilities increase exponentially.

The process I’ve been using up to this point essentially involves recording an acoustic improvisation or composition into Ableton and then running it though a granular sampler, delay, filters, and overdrive in various orders. It allows me to bring a whole new sound into the mix that follows the tonality and emotion (via dynamics) of the original piece while entirely altering the acousic texture. It’s really the same technique that shoegazers have been doing for decades but with a wider variety of input.

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Ah yass. This is amazing! Have to look into this when my Grid arrives.

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