Inspired food, drink


#44

Hadn’t read this thread yet. Very interesting.

The top picture of Almería greenhouses reminds me of one of my favorite contemporary woodblock artists (Morimura Ray). I think it’s strangely beautiful.


#46

Great thread idea! Here are a few interesting ingredients and flavours I’ve come across which I got a bit obsessed with.

Austrian pumpkin seed oil. This stuff is expensive (less so if you buy in in Austria) but tastes amazing and looks even better. When it’s thick it looks red, but when spread out it turns out to be green! I like drizzling it over yogurt with cereals or granola. It’s also great for adding to salads.

Black sesame seed paste is another one. A friend brought me a tube of the real stuff back from Japan which I made into mochi and ice cream (best ice cream ever, even from a die-hard chocolate fan) and ever since I’ve been trying to make my own, generally with poor results.

After some Basque friends taught me how to make starch-thickened basque hot chocolate I’ve been experimenting with the form ever since — adding licorice, alcohol, using different types of dairy product (best results so far were from 1:1:1 dairy milk, rice milk and cream), different spices, which spices not to use (sometimes too many ingredients seem to cancel each other out and result in a tasteless drink). I most recently tried cooking spelt grains into a sludge and using that instead of dairy. After years of experimenting I dropped the original corn starch altogether.
Regardless of the exact ingredients, my takeaway is that the secret to a good texture is patience: bringing it to a simmer then slowly cooling, whisking the skin back into the liquid as it forms.

My most recent obsession is Fesenjaan, a Persian stew made from ground pomegranate seeds and walnuts. The flavour is so intense and sharp and savoury. When I ate it for the first time I thought “this is the food I have been searching for without even knowing it”.

Spending the last few years living in the countryside with some friends, growing a lot of food ourselves and starting a forest garden system has really influenced my style of cooking and eating to prioritise local, organic and seasonal food, at least for the everyday stuff (the more exotic things being reserved for special occasions!) Whilst I still love cooking interesting dishes and recipes, my day-to-day eating now consists of seeing what is available, partially from the garden, and cooking it in whatever way provides healthy, enjoyable food with as little effort as possible. We end up cooking and eating a lot of generic “vegetable stew with tomato sauce and pasta/rice/potatoes and a salad” and it’s some of the best food I’ve ever eaten. We can’t get good quality organic meat where we live, so we end up eating almost completely vegetarian.


#47

Whenever I went back and read through this thread, this caused me to remember that turnips were missing from my life and rectify that.

Thanks!


#48

“Maybe that’s enlightenment enough: to know that there is no final resting place of the mind; no moment of smug clarity. Perhaps wisdom is realising how small I am, and unwise, and how far I have yet to go.”
-Anthony Bourdain

I’m really going to miss him.


#49

I don’t normally react the way I have been when I don’t know the person personally, but I’ve found myself just tearing up throughout the day today. This one is hard.


#50

#51


tamarindo
summer’s here in aztlán!
raw tamarindo pods
agua dulce(bueno)
azúcar/agave/miel
put it in a glass jar in the sun
like 'sun tea(for a few hours)
strain into a pitcher (no need to peel)
add ice, or chill
enjoy :slightly_smiling_face:


#52


Spent yesterday converting the peppers my family and I grew in out gardens this year into a variety of hot sauces. First time making hot sauce so we tried a variety.
I am also interested in exploring fermentation so also pictured are our first attempt: fermenting garlic in honey. I may or may not have been watching a number of episodes of “It’s Alive with Brad” on the Bon Appetite YouTube channel :slight_smile:
Planning on trying to inoculate some rice with some Koji Kin at some point to then start some miso!


#53

Oh! I forgot to ask my question for the lines foodie hivemind. The hot sauce recipes we followed suggested saving the solid material left after straining to dehydrate and use as seasoning. In addition to that we also decided to infuse the solids from the cayenne and garlic sauce (that ended up more like a paste…) in grapeseed oil. I’m confident it will probably be delicious but I’m coming up a little short when it comes to ideas for appropriate applications. Thoughts?


#54

I’ve got a tabasco pepper “bush” that throws off hundreds of wee little peppers, and I’ve taken to making this hot vinegar out of it:

  1. Pick and clean peppers, preferably the ripe red ones
  2. Clip the stem-end of each pepper off to expose their insides
  3. Put about 30 of them in a bottle; I use the latch-topped KORKEN bottles from IKEA. Remember to clean it first!
  4. Add two cloves of garlic that you’ve sliced long-wise three times
  5. Add a teaspoon of whole black peppercorns
  6. Boil some plain old white vinegar
  7. Using a funnel, pour the hot white vinegar into the bottle; the peppers will rise to the top, but ultimately settle down as you’ve cut them open
  8. Let the bottle cool on the countertop, then refrigerate

This gives you a not-too-hot mellow fruity vinegar that is the perfect compliment to all manner of dishes.

You can top it off with vinegar when it starts running low, but you’ll only get away with this a few times. Best to lay down a bunch of bottles.

Experiment with flavors. I did a version with orange (near-ripe) tabasco peppers, garlic, sliced habaneros, whole allspice and a few whole cloves, which resulted in a very different but still-good flavor.


#55

I’d have to go with mint. We have about five varieties in our herb garden and it is very low maintenance.

I also think fresh mint goes well with a lot of stuff. Pizza, pasta, salads… delicious :slightly_smiling_face:

The other ingredient I love is haloumi. We only cook veggie dishes, and haloumi makes a great meat substitute for a lot of dishes (try a Caesar salad with haloumi replacing the chicken :+1:).


#56

did i perchance see mention of gong fu cha above . . . ?


#57

Super late response, but have you had Art in the Age’s Root liqueur? Very good, basically tastes like root beer but not terribly sweet.

It’s discontinued now, but you can still find it at some stores/bars. Worth trying if you’re into that flavor profile :slight_smile:


#58

received a stand mixer for xmas; investigating uses and making plans. currently planning to try making some pizza dough this weekend, hoping to get some sourdough starter from a friend soon to start experimenting with that.


#59

I could have a whole thread just with cocktails


#60

I haven’t tried it! Probably be next to impossible to find it here in Australia.
Making something like a root beer / sarsaparilla amaro or liqueur is definitely on the ‘mad ideas for future endeavors’ list. It is cool to see so many brands entering the herbal, bitter and sweet market here. One I would definitely recommend (some really swank bars might have it in the states) is called Mr Black Coffee Amaro, it is pretty much my favourite in the category. They recently did a marketing push into the states, so you can get their base Coffee Liqueur in a lot of trendy places.


#61

I could definitely get behind this. Care to share any favourites of yours?


#62

Oh boy. I think a new thread is in order


#64


Made pizza dough from scratch today! First time. I think it turned out well! It passed my personal taste test at least :slight_smile:


#65

First crack at miso!