Pattern Synthesis

Hi all, I’m wondering if anyone has access to the University of Surrey database. I’ve found Mark Fell’s PhD thesis on pattern synthesis but I can’t download it.

I’ve seen that he’s written a chapter in the not yet published Oxford Handbook on Algorithmic Music. I’m sure it can be of interest for others in this forum. Thanks in advance!

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Synchronicity!

Was actually just trying to hunt down both the Oxford book, which led me to Fell’s thesis text. Ditto all the above - wonder if anyone else has some leads on either of these?

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By the way, I just noticed it’s published under a CC license, so probably Mark Fell will be happy to share it with you/us. Maybe just try contacting him? I suppose it’s him: http://www.markfell.com/

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Did you have any luck in this endeavour?

I just dropped him a line and asked for a copy! Will let you know if he answers. =)

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He didn’t send me his PhD thesis but he was kind enough to attach the last draft of his article on pattern synthesis for the Oxford Handbook. :slight_smile:

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Any chance you could share the draft? I assume not, but figured there was no harm asking. Mark and I have corresponded before, but don’t think I’d want to bother him about it.

Anyway, all this is cool and exciting, even if I have to wait :slight_smile:

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yeah hearing about that forthcoming book was my gateway into all things yaxu

cant wait

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wow yes ditto all above! anyone have any news on when the Oxford book is coming out?

thanks a lot for the update @ioflow! just downloaded mark fell’s thesis :slight_smile:

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oh dang siq! possible i’m missing an obvious link above, but where were u able to download it from?

http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/804661/

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oh wow oh wow - thanks!

Spent the morning reading a lot of it and listening along to some of his compositions that I had previously found to be difficult. Reading the descriptions of his algorithms opened up a lot of them.

It also turned me on to this brilliant album:

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Farmers Manual! Early Mego stuff rules. So revelatory.

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Yeah! Late 90’s/Early 00’s is my favorite period for electronic music. Powerful sound tech became readily available and everyone was trying to figure out what it all meant. A lot of stuff from that period is still vital and exciting.

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Thank you for sharing

Necropost, but I think about this all the time.

What parallels, if any, do you see between late 90s experimental electronic (Raster Noton, Mego, Tigerbeat6, et al) and music made from say…2015 and now?

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I think about this a lot too! The experimental music of that time period was challenging (in a good way) – I’m thinking of people like Keith Fullerton Whitman, SND, Alva Noto, Ryoji Ikeda, Oval, etc. What they were doing was far away from the dance music of the time, although clicks & cuts did marry some ideas of dance music to the experimental stuff.

Imo, the big difference in experimental electronic music these days is that it exists in a much deeper dialogue with dance music. I’m thinking of labels like Hausu Mountain (eg Fire-Toolz, who rules!) and Pan. You can actually hear some weird approximations to dance music in experimental electronic now – eg, Amnesia Scanner makes experimental stuff that you could almost see being played in a club setting. That’s definitely not true of, say, Mego.

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