Recommend me some amazing Graphic Novels


#1

I’ve just finished re-reading Logicomix, the graphic novel biography of Bertrand Russell, and I’ve got the bug again. I’ve just ordered the first instalments of Saga and The Wicked and The Devine. But I’ll be through them in a week, and want to discover new, preferably indie, new stuff.

You people are artsy and indie - Recommend me some great graphic novels.

I’ll start!

The Nightly News:

Dark, anarchic mix of comic and infogram - Really thought provoking around our relationship with the media.

Palestine:

Whatever you think of the situation in the middle east, this is storytelling at it’s finest.


#2

Not new, but the Strangers in Paradise series is amazing.


#3

Looks great! Thanks!

I didn’t mean necessarily new new, just new to me :smiley:


#4

I’m in the midst of reading Buddha. It’s excellent.

http://www.mangareader.net/buddha


#5

Mother. Fucking. Frank.

Holy shit are these books amazing. I’ve never seen anything like them…

“The Portable Frank” is a good place to start. “Congress of Animals” and “Fran” are also fantastic.


#6

After you’re done you might also enjoy the standalone “MW” from Tezuka.


#7

I just picked this on a whim from the comic shop and it was utterly excellent. kind of a manga western (neither genre i particularly like to be honest) it just looks gorgeous. unfortunately it’s been scrapped so we’ll never know where the story was leading :frowning:

also the life after series has been fun. god’s sun wakes up from purgatory and goes on a journey with ernest hemmingway to save the world like a modern day divine comedy.


#8

Apparently part two starts Nov. 18th - THAT’S TWO DAY’S TIME! https://imagecomics.com/comics/releases/pretty-deadly-6

That’s reason enough for me to get vol. 1.


#9

WAAAAAAAAAAAAATTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT???

cheers mate i was told there wasn’t going to be a 2nd. definitely worth checking out.


#10

i’m a big fan of Paul Chadwick’s “Concrete” series. a political speechwriter has his brain transplanted into a huge stone body… by aliens. trust me, it’s good!


#11

Descender is worth a look. Even if you don’t go for the story, the artwork should sell it to you.

https://imagecomics.com/comics/releases/descender-vol.-1-tin-stars-tp


#12

Chris Ware’s Jimmy Corrigan is a book I’ve read several times, it’s a classic really (at least I think it is?) but it’s a very important piece of art to me

“Building Stories” also came out more recently and it’s great.

I’d have a thousand things to talk about on this topic so I guess I’ll just come from times to times and post a few things ^^


#13

i can’t believe i forgot to mention this first, one of the best things i’ve read in a long time. stop reading this post and go and buy all 4 now

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOWWWWWWWWWWWWWW


#14

i just got turned onto Manhattan Projects. not indie, but realllllllly neat.


#15

Oh, I’ve never picked up the Manhattan Projects - Big fan of Hickman though, his Nightly News and Transhuman are a couple of my favourites.

I feel I should briefly review the comics that I ordered that made me open this thread, just in case anyone else is interested:

The Wicked and The Divine Vol.1:


Troupe of pop stars / gods inhabit the bodies of young people. The artwork is outstanding, the fashion especially. The storyline is purposefully ambiguous, the characters fascinating and complex. I read this all in one evening and it felt like I’d just bingewatched an entire amazing TV series. Will definitely be buying vol. 2.

Saga Vol 1:

If the first collected volume of The Wicked and The Devine felt like an entire TV series, the first volume of Saga feels like the first 10 minutes of one episode. Sure, visually it’s stunning, and the universe in which it takes place feels vast and intricate, but so far the story has only just established characters and relationships. This is currently at Vol. 5, and while I’d love to spend more time with these characters, vol 2 will have to be bloody good to make me want to wade another 3 books in.


#16

Yes on Jimmy Corrigan. Have the book and have gone through some of it, but it’s sooooo dense and crazy. You can spend like 30min on a page just unpacking the crazy timeline stuff.


#17

I’m not sure what your background is or what you’ve read, but Swamp Thing has always been a classic palette-cleanser for me

(from #60 aka Book 6)


#18

Not to mention the “cut it and build it yourself!” pages mimicking kids comics with depressing adult life representations on shiny little carousels. Always wanted to buy an edition just to cut them and try it out, I know Chris Ware is an insane perfectionist so I always assumed they could actually be made but I’m not sure and I’m poor so… Yeah ^^

Anyway I loved Chris Ware since his ACME novelty library, Quimby the mouse and other things like that, which is hilarious and graphically stunning. He had yet to prove he could also be a story teller though and I think Jimmy Corrigan proved that, and more, with style. It’s such a disturbing, moving, fascinating story.


#19

I need to sit down and actually read it. It’s just so massive/impressive it seems impenetrable. I’ll have a look at his other stuff too.


#20

I think you’ll find there’s a more straightforward story than it seems at first glance, beyond the lush aspect, the weird connections, and the flash back and forward. It’s about the scariest feeling on earth: being stuck, being irremediably stuck, and being unable to see the world from any other place than that constant fear that whatever you do it’s gonna come down to something stronger than you crushing anything you might want to acheive before it even starts. And that’s where I feel Ware’s style intervenes beautifully, it’s both a morose aesthetic and a crazy profound one, as if the story, the images, the typos itself never quite accepts the awful starting/ending point it’s describing, or laugh at it constantly. It’s both ironic, cynical, and at the same time, when you think of the amount of work, of dedication, of thoughts about taste and what beauty can mean that the whole thing required, it has that kind of hidden almost unavowable hope I love to find in bleak stories. I could speak about it for hours because its relevant to my work in so many ways I can’t count but yeah, do take some time and read it as if it was not the maze it kinda is, and at some point you’ll just realize it works out and you finished it and maybe (always maybe) you’ll even be moved!

(Post Scriptum: it’s also a story about family, getting old, human psyche, USA and all that stuff, I just pitched it very quickly from a purely general point of view)