Sound + Process: a lines podcast (in-betweens: CKUT / Free City Radio lines mix)

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#61

This was one of my favorite lessons – part of the joy of doing this series is hearing the machinations of people’s approaches and this was a really clarifying point. Especially thinking about the balance of playing through a clocked/structured Ableton Live set while keeping it malleable. Being able to “fuck it up” in the interest of keeping things fun for you as a performer, but not totally destroying the safety of loop and trigger points. Like Nick said, enjoying the freedom of messing with the wet paint but knowing that the picture is still going to take form.

Though I cut it from the final episode, Block Party was a pretty large topic of discussion. A lot of fanboy-ing, but we discussed ways we had been incorporating it into our sets. I’ve really loved running alongside Live – not in ReWire or anything, just pulling in audio from my interface so I could introduce unsynced elements into what happens out of Live. It’s been a ton of fun and I know it was something Nick was going to try with Chris Rosenau at Eaux Claires. Excited to hear more developments on that, @madeofoak!


#62

That really comes across well in the podcasts. You do a helluva job not only in terms of the interviewing, but the editing (both words and music) is really top notch.

And yeah, all of that was really well put by Nick. I might give it another listen to it one of these days as it took me a while to put together who he was, so things would make more sense in the context of his music(s).

Heh, that’s cool about BP. It’s surprising to me to see how many people have been using it since it’s just a mini/beta 1.5 thing, but I’m glad I got it out there while working on the rest of TPV2.


#63

My podcast queue is pretty long but this managed to move to the top priority spot as soon as I listened to the two first episodes. So much inspiration!

Can’t wait until I have some opportunity to listen to the third episode.


#64

Months later, I’m listening to this (as I spent the afternoon soldering up a euro module) - just delightful. So much to think on, so nicely made. Inspiring in the right way - meaningful, thoughtful, not insubstantial euphoria. Thanks, @Dan_Derks and @shellfritsch.


#65

Just listened to this. Brilliant conversation! Very inspiring, and tons of snippets to consider as music gets made. Thank you.


#66

thank you for listening, @infovore and @Myles_Avery! new episode v soon!


#67

after a long hiatus, SOUND + PROCESS is back with @Angela!

talking with Angie was a holistic education – she is truly a multifaceted human whose work in every medium is born of curiosity and play. she’s an open book, which helped us cover her decade-long partnership with @Rodrigo, her recent explorations of biofeedback-triggered light as a medium, and her ideas on everything from the understated beauty of kink porno to navigating one’s sense of self online. she is funny and sharp and I was so thankful to speak with her.

as always, SOUND + PROCESS is a tribute to the unique corner of the 'net that is lines. so excited to see where these convos take us.


#68

yessss so stoked to listen to this!


#69

DAN! Thank you so much for wanting to do this with me…and listening to me…and then editing me! I am so excited to have this out.


#70

your view of elapsed time while experiencing/creating the work is something that resonates with me
but the bits about projecting self thru technology & cultural apathy were my favs

also
I don’t know what this says about me (and dont want to make you self conscious) but I’ll remember this podcast as much for your voice as for what was said

hearing everybody’s voices has been an unexpectedly entertaining part of this podcast series and your manner of speaking stood out even more because it reminded me of a close friend, which was trippy

I assumed you were british before hearing this…after the initial shock wore off i spent the first couple minutes trying to place your accent and eventually gave up


#71

That was wonderful to listen to! (both @Angela and I took a break from packing/moving house to listen to it)

Obviously I know her quite well, and we talk about so many of these things, it’s really refreshing hearing her talk about the stuff.

In a way, I feel like she’s my best kept secret, in that she’s the fucking crazy out there one, which keeps me honest (to what’s important) and sane (to what’s insane).


#72

extraordinary listen-- thank you both for taking the time to really explore so many fascinating branches of this conversation!

very much appreciated the segment on listening awareness.


#74

I thought it might be useful to link here directly some of the things referenced…

A traceing of a frame from porn

Its Fleece Electrostatic

The History of Visual Art, that includes snippets of performances with Takahashi’s Shellfish Concern and earlier than that, failure, arc of beauty


#75

Thanks. That’s really nice to read.
Yeah, cultural apathy is a weird thing (read: touchy) because it is something [other] people identify with so strongly–and in communicating how I feel I also often feel I have to communicate that I am not disrespecting them in any way. But I tend to agree that “culture is not your friend” as Terence McKenna said. And there’s something in Buckminster Fuller’s Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth where he says thinking in terms of your place on land is limiting (as compared to what he called “The Great Pirates” who were sea merchants and set up systems to control that land-linked population.).
And that’s pretty rad that I sound like someone you know! She and I are two special doofuses :slight_smile:


#76

[quote=“Angela, post:75, topic:2813”]
And that’s pretty rad that I sound like someone you know! She and I are two special doofuses
[/quote]Yep she’s cool, kinda similar background as you…born in Cartagena but lived in the states most her life. [quote=“Angela, post:75, topic:2813”]
…cultural apathy is a weird thing (read: touchy) because it is something [other] people identify with so strongly–and in communicating how I feel I also often feel I have to communicate that I am not disrespecting them in any way. But I tend to agree that “culture is not your friend” as Terence McKenna said. And there’s something in Buckminster Fuller’s Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth where he says thinking in terms of your place on land is limiting (as compared to what he called “The Great Pirates” who were sea merchants and set up systems to control that land-linked population.).
[/quote]I’m still coming to grips with this as it concerns my art. There are many cultural circles I could reference or exploit musically but I’ve not deliberately tried the “logical” ones tied my ethnicity and geographic location. Some of the tropes and treasures find their way into my work subconsciously anyway.

The things I’ve attempted to study or weave in on purpose are not anywhere near me in any sense of the word. I think that’s why your comment about being a 90s kid meant so much. You didn’t feel quite right in each of the places you’ve lived and I think a lot of us identify with that.


#77

@Angela
@Dan_Derks
nice work :slight_smile:


#78

I loved the reflections on the “reality” of the traces we leave, through art, through digital expression, etc. These things are “us” (an extension of our bodily existence across a broader spectrum of time and space), in a reduced form, sure, but still, “real”.

I’m using different words than @Angela used, but it’s what my brain does, unprompted, translates the words… it’s like a form of error checking, “does it still make sense in my own semantic schema?”

I’m very happy that we all get an opportunity to spend this time together.


#79

I like the way you put it, and hearing the re-presenting/re-synthesis of the same sentiment is important because…“clear communication is obsolete thinking”…and here it’s clear we’re still thinking! Still forming what it is.


#80

I’ve often thought about how disruptive to our sense of “now” and “then” it would be if we could record and play back smells. The sense of smell seems to operate at such a low level of our brain, and seems to be one of the least susceptible of our senses to trickery/simulation.

So when those VR goggles start shipping with nose plugs, look out.


#81

New year, new episode, new focus.

episode 5:

@marcus_fischer has been a staple figure in modern ambient and experimental music for the better part of the last decade. Characterized by his masterful use of tape loops, his works also build space and emotion through layers of baritone guitar and modular synths. His solo debut, ‘Monocoastal’, was released on 12k in 2010 to international acclaim. Over the course of his career, he has partnered with several artists: Matt Jones, Ted Laderas/The OO-Ray, Simon Scott, Devin Underwood. His collaborations with Taylor Deupree (most recently ‘Twine’) are masterclasses in shared voice and restraint.

note:

Special thanks is much deserved by @jasonw22, @abalone, @myecholalia, @madeofoak, @Rodrigo, @polyoptics, @rbxbx and @tehn. Your contributions helped pay for SC hosting costs and allowed me to purchase a new microphone! My end sounds a hell of a lot better in this episode, all because of your generosity and kindness. Also, Marcus: thank you so much for giving of your time and spirit. Editing this was such a sincere pleasure. Best of luck in Captiva!

goal:

For those interested in helping expand the podcast, I’ve launched a Patreon(!). Monthly contributions start at $1 to get advance access to new episodes, $3 to receive a digest of research to supplement each episode, and $8 gets you all that plus a cassette tape of each new episode (US only for now). The podcast will continue regardless, but I’d love to move to monthly distribution, publish translatable transcripts in a semi-annual SOUND + PROCESS Review, and produce a video episode!

edit (just because it’s been inquired about): for anyone looking to contribute on a one-time basis, this can be done through Paypal at https://paypal.me/soundandprocess

audio:

tldr; I hope you enjoy the conversation!