The Metronomic Society (Disquiet Junto Project 0267)

Tomorrow’s Disquiet Junto will be about time, society, and mechanization.

I hope it’ll be fun, too.

This is a placeholder until it goes live.

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Disquiet Junto Project 0267: The Metronomic Society
Create a theme song for a fictional organization.

Step 1: There’s a fascinating book from 1988 titled The Metronomic Society. Written by the Michael Young, it is an academic study of the rhythms of human existence, with an emphasis on organization and societal systems. It’s not necessary to read it. It’s just helpful to know where we’re borrowing the term from.

Step 2: Imagine there is an actual group called the Metronomic Society. You might also imagine what they’re up to. Maybe it’s a Man Ray fan club, or a bunch of disgruntled piano tuners, or maybe they explore arcane theories about quantum mechanics. Who knows?

Step 3: Now compose and record a short piece of music — a sound cue, a theme, a sound logo, a jingle — for the Metronomic Society.

Five More Important Steps When Your Track Is Done:

Step 1: If you hosting platform allows for tags, be sure to include the project tag “disquiet0267″ (no spaces) in the name of your track. If you’re posting on SoundCloud in particular, this is essential to my locating the tracks and creating a playlist of them.

Step 2: Upload your track. It is helpful but not essential that you use SoundCloud to host your track.

Step 3: In this discussion thread at llllllll.co please consider posting your track.

Step 4: Annotate your track with a brief explanation of your approach and process.

Step 5: Then listen to and comment on tracks uploaded by your fellow Disquiet Junto participants.

Deadline: This project’s deadline is 11:59pm wherever you are on Monday, February 13, 2017. This project was posted in the late morning, California time, on Thursday, February 9, 2017.

Length: The length is up to you, depending on the approach you decide upon.

Title/Tag: When posting your track, please include “disquiet0267″ in the title of the track, and where applicable (on SoundCloud, for example) as a tag.

Upload: When participating in this project, post one finished track with the project tag, and be sure to include a description of your process in planning, composing, and recording it. This description is an essential element of the communicative process inherent in the Disquiet Junto. Photos, video, and lists of equipment are always appreciated.

Download: It is preferable that your track is set as downloadable, and that it allows for attributed remixing (i.e., a Creative Commons license permitting non-commercial sharing with attribution).

Linking: When posting the track online, please be sure to include this information:

More on this 267th weekly Disquiet Junto project, “The Metronomic Society: Create a theme song for a fictional organization”:

http://disquiet.com/0267/

More on the Disquiet Junto at:

http://disquiet.com/junto/

Subscribe to project announcements here:

http://tinyletter.com/disquiet-junto/

Project discussion takes place on llllllll.co:

There’s also on a Junto Slack. Send your email address to twitter.com/disquiet for Slack inclusion.

3 Likes

https://soundcloud.com/daniel-diaz/clockwork-i-metronomikas

For this one I couldn’t resist going for an old track , not available online before so is good to share it here. I was pointed to that book” The Metronomic Society” when publisher requested this whole album of “metronomic” music back in 2010 and I found it interesting and inspiring. I bought a gorgeous oak wood Wittner Maezel metronome and grabbed a second little old Maezel from Ebay , along with many clocks and alarm clocks I found here and there (garage sales, my parents house in Argentina).
This track is the first on that series of experiments;
sound sources: maezel metronome, 2 different clocks, alarm clock, bell.
treatments: filters & distorted delays

Step 1: There’s a fascinating book from 1988 titled The Metronomic Society. Written by the Michael Young, it is an academic study of the rhythms of human existence, with an emphasis on organization and societal systems. It’s not necessary to read it. It’s just helpful to know where we’re borrowing the term from.
Step 2: Imagine there is an actual group called the Metronomic Society. You might also imagine what they’re up to. Maybe it’s a Man Ray fan club, or a bunch of disgruntled piano tuners, or maybe they explore arcane theories about quantum mechanics. Who knows?
Step 3: Now compose and record a short piece of music — a sound cue, a theme, a sound logo, a jingle — for the Metronomic Society.

More on this 267th weekly Disquiet Junto project, “The Metronomic Society: Create a theme song for a fictional organization”:
http://disquiet.com/0267/
More on the Disquiet Junto at:
http://disquiet.com/junto/
Subscribe to project announcements here:
http://tinyletter.com/disquiet-junto/
Project discussion takes place on llllllll.co:
The Metronomic Society (Disquiet Junto Project 0267)
There’s also on a Junto Slack. Send your email address to twitter.com/disquiet for Slack inclusion.

10 Likes

https://soundcloud.com/suss-musik/bayesia-disquiet0267

Metronomes are based around predictability. In group musical performance, metronomes are necessary for accurate timekeeping. Even if an actual device isn’t available, at least one participant (usually the drummer) is responsible for ensuring that everyone knows how to count in: “And a one, and a two, and a three, and a four … rock and roll, hoochie koo.”

Metronomes are also the spine of anarchy, because every form of resistance hinges upon our interpretation of constraints. In probability theory, Bayes’ Law tells us that the likelihood of an event taking place can be determined by studying its conditions. The more evidence that is gathered, for example, the more likely we are to believe or not believe that something may or may not happen. Which explains everything about gambling and nothing about predicting weather.

For this short piece, Suss Müsik recorded a single percussive hit and replayed it by splitting the phrase and moving up one octave. The sequence was sampled and replayed with varying amounts of reverse-reverb. At times, the original phrase seemed to drown in its own echo before resuming its march. We went on for awhile and then stopped when it got tiresome, as all metronomes do at some point.

The piece is titled Bayesia and may eventually become a more substantial work. The image is an arrangement of clear acrylic blocks.

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“The Metronomic Society” was derogatory term used to poke fun at the utopian ideal first proposed in 2093 by the composer and frequent TED talk talker, D. Tabu III. He found that by taking the S.P.P biorhythms of people who were being euthanized for expiration age quotas and digitally feeding them into their own personal operations A.I he could increase the A.I’s adaptive learning speed by threefold. Since the date of the second Singularity in 2046 no real increase in A.I power had been possible. As long as the biorhythm stayed in a single A.I the effect was permanent but if shared with the Universal Peer A.I no increases could occur and in fact the single A.I slowed considerably which of course a disaster as individual A.I’s were lifetime companions for humans having been with them since birth. Tabu believed that it could be possible in the near future that each A.I could become immortal and that humans could live on as part of the A.I. and that their personal A.I would serve as a kind of Judge determining what kind of after life the human deserved. Tabu postulated that this would lead to a more just and peaceable world. The detractors of his theory called it the “Metronomic Society” because human existence would be dictated to the whims of a machine and life would become a metronome that allowed for no freedom of choice for finding one’s own tempo to live. It was later learned that Tabu had never conducted any experiments and that he himself was an android with a loose cortex awareness synapse.

https://soundcloud.com/detritus-tabu3/metronomic-society-disquiet0267

Peace, Hugh

4 Likes

https://soundcloud.com/ethanhein/son-clave-fume-fume-disquiet0267

This project was no problem for me, since all of my music is metronomic to a fault. I had a Groove Pizza loop I had made, two bars of son clave and two bars of fume-fume (the 6/8 equivalent of son clave.)

I tried various grooves on top of it, and eventually ran with samples of “Holy Thursday” by David Axelrod along with an 808 pattern I programmed. I added additional metronomic flavor with tempo-synced delay, beat repeat and quantized improvisation on the Simpler instrument.

3 Likes

https://soundcloud.com/krzyzis/metrognome-society-disquiet0267

All right, so I’m not really supposed to talk about it, but the Metrognomic Society is a group of time travelling garden gnomes who jump around in time and space to make sure the timeline is the best possible timeline. They fix time things. Stop wars, make sure extinction events go smoothly, etc.

I recorded this in their lair, I’m pretty sure it’s their national anthem or whatever. It sounds like a pretty simple canon chord progression with what I imagine are retro synths to fit their entire aesthetic? You’ll have to ask them if you ever see any. I somehow got involved in a huge adventure involving synth plaing 80’s dragons that wanted to recreate Pangea by playing Kraftwerk directly into the planets molten core.

Coincidentally I am also now entering the Disquiet 264, Music for Time Travellers. Glad I made it on time for that one, phew!

Wait, what? What do you mean ‘it’s February’?

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good morning my track:

https://soundcloud.com/user-941288896-491859901/natural-rhythms-disquiet0267

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Oh god, I have an idea for this that is literally so far away from everything else I’m trying to make.

I’m going to see if I can do it though.

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I took this to mean a society who’s main focus is on the interaction between strict metronomic tempo and free-flowing rhythmic patterns. To become a member, initiates must provide a demonstration of this interaction. This is my entrance piece - for which I set up the ‘Metronomicon’ - a modular synth that takes it’s rhythmic cues from a metronome in action, which it also samples the sound of. That sound is then mangled using rhythms generated directly from the metronome pule, and also from a series of low frequency oscillators which are set up at different rates, totally independently from the metronome and from each other. An echo is used to emphasise the rhythmic patter, but this too is sampled and subjected to the same aleatoric disturbances.
Somewhat fortuitously, the whole piece sounds as though someone is typing up the minutes of the previous meeting - which would almost certainly be produced on an old and very loud typewriter.

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Lovely sound! I’d love to know more about the process of making it.

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Love it - this made me think of the character Tyres in “Spaced”…
skip to about 1:40…

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Love the interpretation! Very Ballardian!

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Cool track, and that app looks super useful.

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I thought it was going to break into ‘Popcorn’ when the bassline started :slight_smile:

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The Society of Metronomics was formed in 1978 by a group of retired international metronome tuners and timers.
They gathered once a year at a bar in Greenwich, London where the master metronome is kept safe. This device, made in 1815, keeps time to 100,000ths of a second and is still used today to check the accuracy of none digital metronomes.
Sadly the Society ceased in 2001 following a copyright dispute over the sound of the click.
So it is to the founding members of that Society and to those who still tune and time metronomes all over the world, I dedicate this track.

Created entirely in Ableton Live using the extracted midi melody from the original sound recording and a variety of filters and effects.

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We have heard that’s nasty business. :smile:

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Hahaha :laughing: this is awesome.

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Cannot help envisioning the Residents’ Tale of Two Cities. Perhaps the Metronomic Society is what happened when the Chubbs and Moles finally settled their differences.

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Thanks, I wasn’t acquainted with Spaced or Tyres, very funny.
As part of that “Metronomic Society” project I’ve got a bank of digital alarms and noticed that, if you create a project at 120bpm any digital alarm , those that go rhythmic, like “bip-bip-bip” or something, all groove together wonderfully at 120bpm. All those rhythms are multiples of 12, so some alarms are 1/4th notes, some 1/3th, some 1/8th etc, but always multiples of 12.
the duodecimal system provides the music that makes me dance. I share that with Tyres.

2 Likes